Jewelcadmasters.com

A Sanctuary For Jewelry Designers

Welcome Designers

.. and thank you for vis­it­ing my site. Here you are going to gain knowl­edge on dif­fer­ent aspects and views of Jew­elry Design­ing, Types of Design­ers, the dif­fer­ent and the most pop­u­lar types of Soft­ware for cre­at­ing Jew­elry, The process of how a jew­elry piece is made from begin­ning to end, and much more.

CAD and CAM are two dis­tinct, but closely related, tech­nolo­gies. CAD is an acronym for Com­puter Aided Design, while CAM is an acronym for Com­puter Aided Man­u­fac­tur­ing. Together CAD/CAM allows you to design a piece of jew­elry using a com­puter (CAD) and cre­ate an exact model of that jew­elry piece using a com­puter con­trolled man­u­fac­tur­ing device (CAM). Fol­low­ing are some of the resources for more infor­ma­tion on CAD/CAM and Jew­el­CAD /CAM.

CAD/CAM for Jewelry

CAD and CAM are two dis­tinct, but closely related, tech­nolo­gies. CAD is an acronym for Com­puter Aided Design, while CAM is an acronym for Com­puter Aided Man­u­fac­tur­ing. Together CAD/CAM allows you to design a piece of jew­elry using a com­puter (CAD) and cre­ate an exact model of that jew­elry piece using a com­puter con­trolled man­u­fac­tur­ing device (CAM). Fol­low­ing are some of the resources for more infor­ma­tion on CAD/CAM and Jew­el­CAD /CAM.

CADCOMPUTER AIDED DESIGN SOFTWARE

The soft­ware that dri­ves the CAM and rapid pro­to­typ­ing design process is rapidly chang­ing. For the most part, the jew­elry indus­try is not dri­ving these changes; the changes are being dri­ven by the auto­mo­bile and aero­space indus­tries. Need­less to say, some of the soft­ware is much eas­ier to use than oth­ers. Dif­fer­ent sources of soft­ware cur­rently exist for cre­at­ing mod­els for three-dimensional designs. Here are some of the soft­ware used in design­ing jewelry:

  • Matrix Gemvision
  • T Splines
  • RhinoGold
  • Rhino 4.0
  • Jewelcad
  • ZBrush
  • Monarch JCCD
  • ArtCAM JewelSmith

CAM — Rapid Pro­to­typ­ing Machine


A rapid pro­to­typ­ing machine can auto­mat­i­cally con­struct phys­i­cal mod­els from computer-aided design data. These machines are “3D print­ers” that allow design­ers to quickly cre­ate three-dimensional designs, rather than just two-dimensional pic­tures. There are sev­eral tech­nolo­gies avail­able for rapid prototyping:

Numer­i­cally Con­trolled Milling Machines: Com­puter numer­i­cally con­trolled (CNC) milling machines have been around for a long time. Indus­try has used CNC milling machines for com­plex man­u­fac­tur­ing of items like jet engines and car parts. From the jew­elry per­spec­tive, the engrav­ing indus­try has been the leader in CNC milling. Engravers have focused on devel­op­ing soft­ware for mak­ing dies and stamps. By con­cen­trat­ing on coins, met­als, and cameos, they mas­tered the use of very accu­rate milling in both wax and metals.

Stereo-lithography: The first method of rapid pro­to­typ­ing was called stereo-lithography. Stereo-lithography forms a model from a liq­uid, pho­to­sen­si­tive poly­mer that solid­i­fies when exposed to ultra­vi­o­let light.

Ink-Jet Print­ing: The first “ink-jet” rapid pro­to­typ­ing method was devel­oped at the Mass­a­chu­setts Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, where mod­els were built for parts by spray­ing a bind­ing agent on pow­dered mate­r­ial. The “ink” is actu­ally a starch that binds to the pow­der. An ink-jet print­ing head selec­tively “prints” binder to fuse the pow­der together in the desired areas. Unbound pow­der remains to sup­port the part. As the plat­form is low­ered, more pow­der is added and lev­eled, and the process is repeated. When fin­ished, the part can be removed from the unbound powder.

High Pre­ci­sion 3D Print­ing: This printer pro­duce “wax-like” pat­terns for lost-wax casting/investment cast­ing and mold mak­ing appli­ca­tions. The 3D print­ers receive dig­i­tal input from three-dimensional data files (STL, SLC) and cre­ate solid, three-dimensional parts through an addi­tive, layer-by-layer process with a layer thick­ness [mm] from .0127 to .0762 and a res­o­lu­tion of [dpi] 5,000 x 5,000 x 8,000 XYZ. The pat­terns pro­duced are extremely high res­o­lu­tion with vibrant details and out­stand­ing sur­face finish.

 

 

 

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